Cyberharassment, scams, pornography… this bill which aims to put an end to “impunity on the internet”Cyberharassment, scams, pornography… this bill which aims to put an end to “impunity on the internet”Cyberharassment, scams, pornography… this bill which aims to put an end to “impunity on the internet”Cyberharassment, scams, pornography… this bill which aims to put an end to “impunity on the internet”Cyberharassment, scams, pornography… this bill which aims to put an end to “impunity on the internet”

The text, examined since Tuesday September 19 in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space.

Fight against cyberharassment, child protection, prevention of scams… The bill supported by the majority, examined since Tuesday in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space, with a stated ambition: “Putting an end to impunity on the internet and the law of the strongest.”

Adopted at first reading in the Senate last summer, this text “transforms into our French law a regulation that France introduced last year and adopted by the entire European Union”, recalls the Minister Delegate in charge of the Digital Transition , Jean-Noël Barrot, quoted by France Inter.

For the first time, the law requires major social media platforms to care about the consequences they have on the world

The regulation on digital services, or Digital Services Act (DSA), thus entered into force on August 25 in the Union. “The objective is to make digital players responsible so that they fight against the propagation of illicit, harmful or illegal content on their services,” explains Arcom, the audiovisual and digital policeman.

“For the first time, the law requires large social media platforms to worry about the consequences they have on the world and on their users, and in particular on their health,” argues Jean-Noël Barrot.

The algorithms of large platforms can be scrutinized by researchers. They will be sanctioned “if they do not take care to analyze and correct these risks, and in particular those they pose to children”, adds the minister.

Anti-scam filters and citizen reserve

“An application like TikTok could be sanctioned up to 6% of its global turnover”, if it does not respect its obligations, or up to “600 million euros”, he underlines.

At a time when several teenage suicides are shedding harsh light on the ravages of cyberbullying, the bill examined by the deputies also targets “all those who spread hatred online”, continues the minister.

Lessons from the riots

With a six-month ban from platforms. According to Le Monde, the text should also take into account the debates which focused last summer on the role of social networks in the propagation of the riots which followed the death of young Nahel.

The creation of a “digital citizen reserve” is notably under study. The text also proposes the implementation of an “anti-scam filter”, a campaign promise from Emmanuel Macron.

An alert message

Concretely, French people who click on a fraudulent email or SMS will land on the website of the Ministry of the Interior, where they will see an alert message appear. Other measures are considered more complex, or even difficult to apply.

The bill proposes, for example, the possibility for Arcom to block and dereference pornographic sites that do not verify whether users are of legal age.

The delicate question of access to pornographic sites

However, according to a report from the General Inspectorate of Finance, relayed by BFMTV, there is at this stage no fully satisfactory solution, that is to say both effective and respectful of personal data.

Many amendments tabled are also debated. One of them, particularly controversial, aimed to ban the use of VPNs on social networks. It was eventually removed.

Another downside is that the bill does not address the issue, although major, of artificial intelligence. But the Prime Minister, Élisabeth Borne, launched a national strategic committee dedicated to this sensitive issue on Tuesday.

The text, examined since Tuesday September 19 in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space.

Fight against cyberharassment, child protection, prevention of scams… The bill supported by the majority, examined since Tuesday in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space, with a stated ambition: “Putting an end to impunity on the internet and the law of the strongest.”

Adopted at first reading in the Senate last summer, this text “transforms into our French law a regulation that France introduced last year and adopted by the entire European Union”, recalls the Minister Delegate in charge of the Digital Transition , Jean-Noël Barrot, quoted by France Inter.

For the first time, the law requires major social media platforms to care about the consequences they have on the world

The regulation on digital services, or Digital Services Act (DSA), thus entered into force on August 25 in the Union. “The objective is to make digital players responsible so that they fight against the propagation of illicit, harmful or illegal content on their services,” explains Arcom, the audiovisual and digital policeman.

“For the first time, the law requires large social media platforms to worry about the consequences they have on the world and on their users, and in particular on their health,” argues Jean-Noël Barrot.

The algorithms of large platforms can be scrutinized by researchers. They will be sanctioned “if they do not take care to analyze and correct these risks, and in particular those they pose to children”, adds the minister.

Anti-scam filters and citizen reserve

“An application like TikTok could be sanctioned up to 6% of its global turnover”, if it does not respect its obligations, or up to “600 million euros”, he underlines.

At a time when several teenage suicides are shedding harsh light on the ravages of cyberbullying, the bill examined by the deputies also targets “all those who spread hatred online”, continues the minister.

Lessons from the riots

With a six-month ban from platforms. According to Le Monde, the text should also take into account the debates which focused last summer on the role of social networks in the propagation of the riots which followed the death of young Nahel.

The creation of a “digital citizen reserve” is notably under study. The text also proposes the implementation of an “anti-scam filter”, a campaign promise from Emmanuel Macron.

An alert message

Concretely, French people who click on a fraudulent email or SMS will land on the website of the Ministry of the Interior, where they will see an alert message appear. Other measures are considered more complex, or even difficult to apply.

The bill proposes, for example, the possibility for Arcom to block and dereference pornographic sites that do not verify whether users are of legal age.

The delicate question of access to pornographic sites

However, according to a report from the General Inspectorate of Finance, relayed by BFMTV, there is at this stage no fully satisfactory solution, that is to say both effective and respectful of personal data.

Many amendments tabled are also debated. One of them, particularly controversial, aimed to ban the use of VPNs on social networks. It was eventually removed.

Another downside is that the bill does not address the issue, although major, of artificial intelligence. But the Prime Minister, Élisabeth Borne, launched a national strategic committee dedicated to this sensitive issue on Tuesday.

The text, examined since Tuesday September 19 in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space.

Fight against cyberharassment, child protection, prevention of scams… The bill supported by the majority, examined since Tuesday in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space, with a stated ambition: “Putting an end to impunity on the internet and the law of the strongest.”

Adopted at first reading in the Senate last summer, this text “transforms into our French law a regulation that France introduced last year and adopted by the entire European Union”, recalls the Minister Delegate in charge of the Digital Transition , Jean-Noël Barrot, quoted by France Inter.

For the first time, the law requires major social media platforms to care about the consequences they have on the world

The regulation on digital services, or Digital Services Act (DSA), thus entered into force on August 25 in the Union. “The objective is to make digital players responsible so that they fight against the propagation of illicit, harmful or illegal content on their services,” explains Arcom, the audiovisual and digital policeman.

“For the first time, the law requires large social media platforms to worry about the consequences they have on the world and on their users, and in particular on their health,” argues Jean-Noël Barrot.

The algorithms of large platforms can be scrutinized by researchers. They will be sanctioned “if they do not take care to analyze and correct these risks, and in particular those they pose to children”, adds the minister.

Anti-scam filters and citizen reserve

“An application like TikTok could be sanctioned up to 6% of its global turnover”, if it does not respect its obligations, or up to “600 million euros”, he underlines.

At a time when several teenage suicides are shedding harsh light on the ravages of cyberbullying, the bill examined by the deputies also targets “all those who spread hatred online”, continues the minister.

Lessons from the riots

With a six-month ban from platforms. According to Le Monde, the text should also take into account the debates which focused last summer on the role of social networks in the propagation of the riots which followed the death of young Nahel.

The creation of a “digital citizen reserve” is notably under study. The text also proposes the implementation of an “anti-scam filter”, a campaign promise from Emmanuel Macron.

An alert message

Concretely, French people who click on a fraudulent email or SMS will land on the website of the Ministry of the Interior, where they will see an alert message appear. Other measures are considered more complex, or even difficult to apply.

The bill proposes, for example, the possibility for Arcom to block and dereference pornographic sites that do not verify whether users are of legal age.

The delicate question of access to pornographic sites

However, according to a report from the General Inspectorate of Finance, relayed by BFMTV, there is at this stage no fully satisfactory solution, that is to say both effective and respectful of personal data.

Many amendments tabled are also debated. One of them, particularly controversial, aimed to ban the use of VPNs on social networks. It was eventually removed.

Another downside is that the bill does not address the issue, although major, of artificial intelligence. But the Prime Minister, Élisabeth Borne, launched a national strategic committee dedicated to this sensitive issue on Tuesday.

The text, examined since Tuesday September 19 in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space.

Fight against cyberharassment, child protection, prevention of scams… The bill supported by the majority, examined since Tuesday in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space, with a stated ambition: “Putting an end to impunity on the internet and the law of the strongest.”

Adopted at first reading in the Senate last summer, this text “transforms into our French law a regulation that France introduced last year and adopted by the entire European Union”, recalls the Minister Delegate in charge of the Digital Transition , Jean-Noël Barrot, quoted by France Inter.

For the first time, the law requires major social media platforms to care about the consequences they have on the world

The regulation on digital services, or Digital Services Act (DSA), thus entered into force on August 25 in the Union. “The objective is to make digital players responsible so that they fight against the propagation of illicit, harmful or illegal content on their services,” explains Arcom, the audiovisual and digital policeman.

“For the first time, the law requires large social media platforms to worry about the consequences they have on the world and on their users, and in particular on their health,” argues Jean-Noël Barrot.

The algorithms of large platforms can be scrutinized by researchers. They will be sanctioned “if they do not take care to analyze and correct these risks, and in particular those they pose to children”, adds the minister.

Anti-scam filters and citizen reserve

“An application like TikTok could be sanctioned up to 6% of its global turnover”, if it does not respect its obligations, or up to “600 million euros”, he underlines.

At a time when several teenage suicides are shedding harsh light on the ravages of cyberbullying, the bill examined by the deputies also targets “all those who spread hatred online”, continues the minister.

Lessons from the riots

With a six-month ban from platforms. According to Le Monde, the text should also take into account the debates which focused last summer on the role of social networks in the propagation of the riots which followed the death of young Nahel.

The creation of a “digital citizen reserve” is notably under study. The text also proposes the implementation of an “anti-scam filter”, a campaign promise from Emmanuel Macron.

An alert message

Concretely, French people who click on a fraudulent email or SMS will land on the website of the Ministry of the Interior, where they will see an alert message appear. Other measures are considered more complex, or even difficult to apply.

The bill proposes, for example, the possibility for Arcom to block and dereference pornographic sites that do not verify whether users are of legal age.

The delicate question of access to pornographic sites

However, according to a report from the General Inspectorate of Finance, relayed by BFMTV, there is at this stage no fully satisfactory solution, that is to say both effective and respectful of personal data.

Many amendments tabled are also debated. One of them, particularly controversial, aimed to ban the use of VPNs on social networks. It was eventually removed.

Another downside is that the bill does not address the issue, although major, of artificial intelligence. But the Prime Minister, Élisabeth Borne, launched a national strategic committee dedicated to this sensitive issue on Tuesday.

The text, examined since Tuesday September 19 in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space.

Fight against cyberharassment, child protection, prevention of scams… The bill supported by the majority, examined since Tuesday in committee at the National Assembly, aims to secure and regulate the digital space, with a stated ambition: “Putting an end to impunity on the internet and the law of the strongest.”

Adopted at first reading in the Senate last summer, this text “transforms into our French law a regulation that France introduced last year and adopted by the entire European Union”, recalls the Minister Delegate in charge of the Digital Transition , Jean-Noël Barrot, quoted by France Inter.

For the first time, the law requires major social media platforms to care about the consequences they have on the world

The regulation on digital services, or Digital Services Act (DSA), thus entered into force on August 25 in the Union. “The objective is to make digital players responsible so that they fight against the propagation of illicit, harmful or illegal content on their services,” explains Arcom, the audiovisual and digital policeman.

“For the first time, the law requires large social media platforms to worry about the consequences they have on the world and on their users, and in particular on their health,” argues Jean-Noël Barrot.

The algorithms of large platforms can be scrutinized by researchers. They will be sanctioned “if they do not take care to analyze and correct these risks, and in particular those they pose to children”, adds the minister.

Anti-scam filters and citizen reserve

“An application like TikTok could be sanctioned up to 6% of its global turnover”, if it does not respect its obligations, or up to “600 million euros”, he underlines.

At a time when several teenage suicides are shedding harsh light on the ravages of cyberbullying, the bill examined by the deputies also targets “all those who spread hatred online”, continues the minister.

Lessons from the riots

With a six-month ban from platforms. According to Le Monde, the text should also take into account the debates which focused last summer on the role of social networks in the propagation of the riots which followed the death of young Nahel.

The creation of a “digital citizen reserve” is notably under study. The text also proposes the implementation of an “anti-scam filter”, a campaign promise from Emmanuel Macron.

An alert message

Concretely, French people who click on a fraudulent email or SMS will land on the website of the Ministry of the Interior, where they will see an alert message appear. Other measures are considered more complex, or even difficult to apply.

The bill proposes, for example, the possibility for Arcom to block and dereference pornographic sites that do not verify whether users are of legal age.

The delicate question of access to pornographic sites

However, according to a report from the General Inspectorate of Finance, relayed by BFMTV, there is at this stage no fully satisfactory solution, that is to say both effective and respectful of personal data.

Many amendments tabled are also debated. One of them, particularly controversial, aimed to ban the use of VPNs on social networks. It was eventually removed.

Another downside is that the bill does not address the issue, although major, of artificial intelligence. But the Prime Minister, Élisabeth Borne, launched a national strategic committee dedicated to this sensitive issue on Tuesday.

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